Republic Resume
4.9
Based on 54 reviews
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T 2020
T 2020
00:07 03 Oct 19
Very prompt, pleasure to deal with. Highly Recommended.. understands how to deliver a quality resume by capturing... career wins in a short and concise way.read more
Natasha Lockett
Natasha Lockett
00:32 28 Sep 19
Malcom was extremely professional and efficient. Yes there are questions you need to provide answers for to Malcom of... course and the quicker you reply to him the quicker your resume is tailored to your needs. Would highly recommend to anyone.read more
Eliane Lim
Eliane Lim
12:04 27 Sep 19
Great Service! I strongly recommend Malcolm service! He did a fantastic resume for me and I got a job within a month!
Geuel Manaen Manzano II
Geuel Manaen Manzano II
09:44 20 Aug 19
Very professional. Replies promptly. I used the resume he made for my application for Engineers Australia and it... passed. I would recommend him for people who need to update their resume.read more
SW Y
SW Y
12:35 15 Aug 19
Was so lucky to find these people especially Malcolm. He edited my horrible resume to the top quality written one. He... was also so fast and such professional writer that I could trust 100%. Anyone who needs help with resume writing, I strongly recommend here.read more
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Writing your own resume – Seek

This is from Seek and it is good advice if you are writing your own resume.

Take out the objective. Seeing that you’re already applying for the job, it’s obvious you want it. You can cover your desire for the role in your cover letter, or if you’re changing industries, it may be useful to include a brief introductory summary in the resume.

Brief is best. While you may have aced making milkshakes at the cafe you worked for in high school, it’s time to get rid of that clutter if it’s not related to the role you want to pursue now. Give more space to detail about your current or recent jobs and less about the past. If it doesn’t fit on one to two pages – it’s not worth writing about! Make sure you include specific skills that are relevant to the job you’re applying for, even if that means adjusting your resume for each new application.

No unnecessary info. That includes your age, marital status, religion or nationality. This might have been the standard in the past, but all of this information is now illegal for your employer to ask you, and there’s no need to include it. For security reasons, don’t include your date of birth, and definitely not your bank account details. As for an address, a suburb and postcode will suffice.

Make it straightforward. Use simple text in one modern, standard font that is easy to read, and that everyone can understand. As everything in your resume is about your experiences, avoid writing in first or third person. For example, instead of writing “I managed a team of three”, or “Sarah managed a team of three” rather write “responsible for managing a team of 3” in concise bullet points below headlines where necessary.

Avoid using cluttered or complicated layouts with headers, footers, tables or other items that may not look right when viewed on different computers with varying software versions. Make sure you also run a spell check to pick up any errors – a big mistake that is easy to avoid.

Be professional and discreet. You may still be using the same email address that you set up when Hotmail came about in the 90’s, but if it’s anything that looks unprofessional, it might be worth your while setting up a new one for the purpose of your job applications. Avoid using your current work email address, or phone number for that matter, unless you want to get yourself into trouble!

Keep to the employer’s submission requirements. Above all, you won’t get noticed if you don’t follow all of the specific requirements that have been instructed in the job description. Often both resumes and cover letters are requested in a certain file format (doc, pdf, docx, rtt).

Put your best foot forward

Malcolm builds expert resumes, cover letters and LinkedIn profiles, which unleash an unbeatable business case to promote you as a 'must have' asset to an employer.