Republic Resume
4.9
Based on 55 reviews
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Erin Carnachan
Erin Carnachan
00:54 17 Feb 20
After googling and researching different companies, I contacted Malcolm to re-write my very old and outdated resume.... Malcolm was quick to respond, gave me an upfront quote and got straight to work. Malcolm worked with me to come up with a professionally written resume that really highlighted my skills and experiences and a cover letter that specifically targeted the job I wanted to apply for. Malcolm has been friendly, professional and efficient. I highly recommend Malcolm from Resume Republic.read more
T 2020
T 2020
00:07 03 Oct 19
Very prompt, pleasure to deal with. Highly Recommended.. understands how to deliver a quality resume by capturing... career wins in a short and concise way.read more
Natasha Lockett
Natasha Lockett
00:32 28 Sep 19
Malcom was extremely professional and efficient. Yes there are questions you need to provide answers for to Malcom of... course and the quicker you reply to him the quicker your resume is tailored to your needs. Would highly recommend to anyone.read more
Eliane Lim
Eliane Lim
12:04 27 Sep 19
Great Service! I strongly recommend Malcolm service! He did a fantastic resume for me and I got a job within a month!
Geuel Manaen Manzano II
Geuel Manaen Manzano II
09:44 20 Aug 19
Very professional. Replies promptly. I used the resume he made for my application for Engineers Australia and it... passed. I would recommend him for people who need to update their resume.read more
SW Y
SW Y
12:35 15 Aug 19
Was so lucky to find these people especially Malcolm. He edited my horrible resume to the top quality written one. He... was also so fast and such professional writer that I could trust 100%. Anyone who needs help with resume writing, I strongly recommend here.read more
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Job interview questions part two

Here is the second part of Republic Resumes interview questions and approaches. Job interviews are weird and contrived situations but the advice here will help you prepare.

“Why do you want to leave your current job?”

Let’s start with what you shouldn’t say (or, if you’re the interviewer, what are definite red flags). Don’t talk about how your boss is difficult. Don’t talk about how you can’t get along with other employees. Don’t bad-mouth your company. Focus on the positives a move will bring. Talk about what you want to achieve.

“What kind of work environment do you like best?”

Take a step back and think about the job you’re applying for and the company’s culture. Find ways to highlight how the company’s environment will work well for you — and if you can’t find ways, don’t take the job, because you’ll be miserable.

“What is your leadership style?”

This is a tough question to answer without dipping into platitudes. Try sharing leadership examples instead. Say, “The best way for me to answer that is to give you a few examples of leadership challenges I’ve faced,” and then share situations where you dealt with a problem, motivated a team, worked through a crisis. Explain what you did and that will give the interviewer a great sense of how you lead.

“Tell me about a time you disagreed with a decision. What did you do?”

No one agrees with every decision. Disagreements are fine; it’s what you do when you disagree that matters. (We all know people who love to have the “meeting after the meeting,” where they’ve supported a decision in the meeting but they then go out and undermine it.) Show that you raised your concerns in a productive way. Every company wants employees willing to be honest and forthright, to share concerns and issues, but to also get behind a decision and support it as if they agreed, even if they didn’t.

“Tell me how you think other people would describe you.”

I hate this question. It’s a total throwaway. How about this for a reply. “I think people would say that what you see is what you get. If I say I will do something, I do it. If I say I will help, I help. I’m not sure that everyone likes me, but they all know they can count on what I say and how hard I work.”

“What was your salary in your last job?

This is a tricky one. You want to be open and honest, but frankly, some companies ask the question as the opening move in salary negotiations. When asked, say, “I’m focusing on jobs in the $50K range. Is this position in that range?” Know this first.

“What questions do you have for me?”

Don’t waste this opportunity. Ask smart questions, not just as a way to show you’re a great candidate but also to see if the company is a good fit for you — after all, you’re being interviewed, but you’re also interviewing the company.

Put your best foot forward

Malcolm builds expert resumes, cover letters and LinkedIn profiles, which unleash an unbeatable business case to promote you as a 'must have' asset to an employer.